Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Light Trials of Moving Cars (Thika Road) Kenya

Lifes light. Life is light. You can make light do anything you want to. Photography means 'light writing'...Jessy Kigen


Light Trails continue to be popular subject matter for many photographers and they can actually be a great training ground for those wanting to get their cameras out of manual mode and to experiment with shooting in low light at longer exposures.

Here is my story;
        From a long day shoot on my way home i was  amazed by the lighting and the way cars was moving up and down the great  road of Thika road.
The sun had gone home there was slightly beam of light from the sun ....."The Golden moment"
 I took out my camera to shoot the Golden Moment, but i realized for me to get a nice  light trails from a moving car i need a tripod 
Nooo!!!!!  i had no tripod with me but i could improvise the Bridge Pavement or the wall to place my camera for steady shot with no shaky movement.

See what i photographed.
The mighty Thika Road.(kenya) photo by Jessy Kigen







  

Camera Model: Canon Eos 600D
Iso speed : ISO-100
F-Stop  f/20
Exposure time. 30sec.









                               How  to Shoot Light Trails 

Equipment:

There is not just one particular type of camera and kit that you’ll need to capture light trails – however it is important to have a camera that allows you to have some control over exposure settings – particularly those that allow you to choose longer shutter speeds. This means you need a camera that has the ability to shoot in either full manual mode and/or shutter priority mode (something that all DSLRs and many point and shoot cameras have).
You’ll also need a tripod (or some other way to making your camera completely still) as you’ll be shooting with long shutter speeds which will make shooting handheld pretty much impossible.
Not essential but helpful to have with you are lens hoods (to help block lens flare from ambient lights), remote shutter release cables or wireless remote controls, patience and some warm clothes if you’re going out on a chilly night.

Setting Up Your Shot:

Photographing light trails is not difficult – it’s as simple as finding virtually any road with cars going down it once the sun goes down. But getting a shot that grabs attention means putting a little more thought into choosing your location, thinking about timing and framing your image. Here are a few tips on how to set your shot up:
  • Timing/Light – one might think that the middle of the night is the best time for light trail photography (and it can be) – however one very effective time to do it is just as the sun is going down (just before and after). If you shoot at this time you’ll not only capture light from cars, but ambient light in the sky which can add atmosphere to your shots. You also might find that earlier in the evening you get a little more ‘action’ in your shot with more cars and even the movement of people through your shot.
  • Creative Perspectives – some of the most effective light trail shots that I’ve taken and seen from others were taken from perspectives other than at the height of a normal person standing up. Get down low or find a place looking down on your scene that will create an unusual angle.
  • Location – the most obvious thing with location is that you’ll need it to be somewhere near a road – however there’s more to think about than that. Choose a location that adds interest to the shot in some way. This might be one where there are well lit buildings along the road, one where multiple roads merge together to create light trails in different directions, on the bend of a road so that the trails sweep through the image, near a roundabout so the trails create circular shapes, in the middle of dual carriageways (on a triaffic island) so that you get traffic coming in two directions etc.  
  • Framing – the normal ‘rules’ of composition apply in this type of photography. Images need some sort of point/s of interest, the rule of thirds can be applied effectively, draw the eyes into your image using lines smartly, foregounds and backgrounds should add to and not distract from the image.
    The mightyThika Road(Kenya)  Photo by. Jessy Kigen



Camera Model: Canon Eos 600D
Iso speed : ISO-100
F-Stop  f/20
Exposure time. 30sec.





  
  • Choose a low ISO setting - this will give you images with as little noise as possible.  
 
  • Shoot in RAW if you have it -this will enable you to have more control in your post production work – particularly in getting white balance right (something that can be important as you’re shooting in a situation with lots of artificial light that can cause all kinds of color casts in your shot).
  • Manual Focus - In low light situations cameras can struggle to get focusing locked correctly. The last thing you want is for your camera to be in and out of focus just as you need to hit the shutter release. Switch to manual focus and make sure your focus is upon a part of your image that is visually strong.
  • Using Bulb Mode

    Many digital cameras have a mode on them called ‘bulb’ mode that allows you as the photographer to keep the shutter open as long as you wish. This can be very handy in this type of photography to time your shots with precision. If you use this you’ll want to be using a remote shutter release to stop any camera movement while the shutter is open. 

    Am sure when yo follow up the process above yo will come with Amazing light Trails. Thanks for Reading.
     
    Got some good light trail shots?   i will be delighted if you share and we  learn more on this  blog......Am out #slickphotobyjessykigen......My story There life's. Article by. Jessy Kigen.courtesy of Digital photography school.

     


     

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

The streets from Above.(Aerial photography) of Nairobi city

The streets from Above.  photo by Jessy kigen
Sorry Guys i had to break  the rule, i had to go above the streets , normally i shoot the street from below getting the interesting geometric composition of the streets and its day walkers,  but this time i wanted to have a view of the streets  and how it looks from aerial view.

The streets look so stunning from above, sometime i wish i could have a pilot friend to fly me around while shooting the streets from above. Anyway that's my wish, besides  that, there are many ways to shoot the streets from above, the most efficient and affordable way is by trying to find the tallest building in your city get the legal access from the management then  climb to the top ....Mount your camera in your tripod in this  case to get steady and a balanced picture.

other ways of shooting the streets from above are ,  aircraft, helicopters, multirotor Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), balloons, blimps and dirigibles, rockets, kites, parachutes Drones.

I prefer using the tallest building because  it affordable, efficient, yo can do a lot, you take your time Adjusting your camera and mounting it..then shoot at your own pace unlike the helicopter where everything is limited and expensive.....

when  i shoot the streets i normally use my free hand because of the flexibility not unless am shooting light trails (long exposure)...this will force me to use  a tripod .(You need a tripod (or some other way to making your camera completely still) as you’ll be shooting with long shutter speeds which will make shooting handheld pretty much impossible.).

On  aerial photography above  i used a Tripod because i was in a flat surface where i could mount my camera...and this enable me to get a nice city scape or a street view from above....the photo above was shot at KICC Nairobi courtesy of Slick photo by Jessy kigen .......Am out..My story there life's ..   Article by Jessy Kigen. check more on my photography story and share out thank you.

You don't take a photograph, you make it..... Ansel Adams





Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Photography and lighting.

Photo by: Jessy kigen


"Where light and shadow fall on your subject - that is the essence of expression and art through photography" jessy kigen 

Light is more than just how bright or dark it is; it’s also the key to the look, mood and atmosphere of your images. The direction of the light will affect how the shape and texture of your subject appears, while the colour and how soft or harsh the light is can totally change a shot’s appearance.

The picture above was shot inside a train wagon, A model was sited in a coach where  natural light was coming from the window..

There is something beautiful and incredibly engaging about photos that have been shot in natural light. The natural light of the sun can create stunning colors spanning the whole spectral range, something that just can’t be achieved with artificial lighting. Learning to harness the power and light of the sun in your photographs is a fantastic technique for taking your photography to the next level.
Playing with natural light in your photographs will likely take a bit of practice and of course, experimentation. You will need to learn how your camera handles natural light, and begin to understand what settings work best for you. But we’ve put together a few digital photography tips to get you started shooting in natural light. - See more at: http://thebeginnerslens.com/digital-photography/photography-tips-for-shooting-in-natural-light.html#sthash.IjAVxaEs.dpuf
 There is something beautiful and incredibly engaging about photos that have been shot in natural light. The natural light of the sun can create stunning colors spanning the whole spectral range, something that just can’t be achieved with artificial lighting. Learning to harness the power and light of the sun in your photographs is a fantastic technique for taking your photography to the next level.

Using shadows to create a mood on your photos----
You already know that shadows can give a photo dimension and become part of the subject of your photograph. But did you know that shadows also create a “mood” in your photo. A photo that is heavy with shadows, where there is more shadow than light creates a dark, intense, or even ominous mood. - 

your photos is a technique that is best practiced with outdoor shooting, you can also use natural light to your advantage when shooting inside. Using the natural light from a nearby window can create dramatic effects.  The photo above you can easy tell the mood of the model and the effect that was created just from the direction of the light from the window,  mostly dark photograph automatically conveys a sense of looming terror.

Try use natural light and experience stunning effect in your subject, best time early at the dawn and when the sun sets...perfect moment i call it the "Golden Moment"...am out......#slickphoto#photography....My story there life's ..share out the post.......Article by: Jessy Kigen
A mostly dark photograph automatically conveys a sense of looming terror - See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/1546/how-lighting-affects-the-mood-of-your-photos/#sthash.AbKJcPda.dpuf
You already know that shadows can give a photo dimension and become part of the subject of your photograph. But did you know that shadows also create a “mood” in your photo. A photo that is heavy with shadows, where there is more shadow than light creates a dark, intense, or even ominous mood. - See more at: http://thebeginnerslens.com/digital-photography/photography-tips-for-shooting-in-natural-light.html#sthash.IjAVxaEs.dpufA mostly dark photograph automatically conveys a sense of looming terror -
There is something beautiful and incredibly engaging about photos that have been shot in natural light. The natural light of the sun can create stunning colors spanning the whole spectral range, something that just can’t be achieved with artificial lighting. Learning to harness the power and light of the sun in your photographs is a fantastic technique for taking your photography to the next level.
Playing with natural light in your photographs will likely take a bit of practice and of course, experimentation. You will need to learn how your camera handles natural light, and begin to understand what settings work best for you. But we’ve put together a few digital photography tips to get you started shooting in natural light. - See more at: http://thebeginnerslens.com/digital-photography/photography-tips-for-shooting-in-natural-light.html#sthash.IjAVxaEs.dpuf

There is something beautiful and incredibly engaging about photos that have been shot in natural light. The natural light of the sun can create stunning colors spanning the whole spectral range, something that just can’t be achieved with artificial lighting. Learning to harness the power and light of the sun in your photographs is a fantastic technique for taking your photography to the next level.
Playing with natural light in your photographs will likely take a bit of practice and of course, experimentation. You will need to learn how your camera handles natural light, and begin to understand what settings work best for you. But we’ve put together a few digital photography tips to get you started shooting in natural light. - See more at: http://thebeginnerslens.com/digital-photography/photography-tips-for-shooting-in-natural-light.html#sthash.IjAVxaEs.dpuf
There is something beautiful and incredibly engaging about photos that have been shot in natural light. The natural light of the sun can create stunning colors spanning the whole spectral range, something that just can’t be achieved with artificial lighting. Learning to harness the power and light of the sun in your photographs is a fantastic technique for taking your photography to the next level.
Playing with natural light in your photographs will likely take a bit of practice and of course, experimentation. You will need to learn how your camera handles natural light, and begin to understand what settings work best for you. But we’ve put together a few digital photography tips to get you started shooting in natural light. - See more at: http://thebeginnerslens.com/digital-photography/photography-tips-for-shooting-in-natural-light.html#sthash.IjAVxaEs.dpuf

There is something beautiful and incredibly engaging about photos that have been shot in natural light. The natural light of the sun can create stunning colors spanning the whole spectral range, something that just can’t be achieved with artificial lighting. Learning to harness the power and light of the sun in your photographs is a fantastic technique for taking your photography to the next level.
Playing with natural light in your photographs will likely take a bit of practice and of course, experimentation. You will need to learn how your camera handles natural light, and begin to understand what settings work best for you. But we’ve put together a few digital photography tips to get you started shooting in natural light. - See more at: http://thebeginnerslens.com/digital-photography/photography-tips-for-shooting-in-natural-light.html#sthash.IjAVxaEs.dpuf

Friday, August 15, 2014

A Blur day walker

Photo by; Jessy Kigen 

"Am not interested in shooting new things-Am interested to see things new" Jessy Kigen

Woke up to a very Gloomy mood, checked my fridge and there was  nothing to drink and eat, i thought coffee would do a great favor  for me on a chilly Sunday at my favorite restaurant "Kapital coffee House" But then i remembered i had  mission on the streets with the day walkers.

My Motto still remains My story there life's.

Before i could go to the coffee place i decided,  let me try take a few shots of the streets and its walkers, the streets was  chilly with less walkers. I just needed one shot and am done with the day after all it was a gloomy day and i came to have coffee, am that loyal....so i  went to Kapital Coffee House, i sat at an angel where i could see the exit of the Restaurant simply because i still needed that one shot of a day walker walking, and at the exit of the Restaurant that was the better place to get the shot. Guess what? i got the shot that i really wanted ,  you would think it was all staged but this was real, i used my iPhone to archive this shot.   but it took me awhile before i got the photo above.

lesson learn t; as a street photographer always be passionate and be Patient. The streets belong to us. Am out ...#slickphoto#street photographer  story by Jessy kigen .

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Make your Street photography interesting.

Photo by, Jessy Kigen

Sometimes i pretend to focus on anything close to me but all i need is a day walker....check out the day walker at the end of the street....  

 Lets make this more interesting, Am a great follower of  a street photographer Eric Kim simply because he is so precise on his photographs and his articles are Amazing. Today i want to talk more  on how to  make your street photography interesting even when you are bored.

 "One of the most exciting ways to live life is to avoid boredom. By following what makes us curious, passionate, and have fun create meaning in our life.
one of the great ways to guide our work in street photography is to avoid boredom." Eric Kim

Tips to make Street photography interesting. 

In street photography, i always make sure that i listen to my self, By making street photography interesting we should avoid boredom at all cost. we need to be Passionate.

for a  street street photographer is really hard to avoid boredom and make it interesting when one is not passionate. There are days where we get mishaps. There are days  we feel Gloomy  and  we just want to stay indoor lazily. or maybe walk all day on the street and not find anything to shoot.

Through my Guide, we should try avoid boredom and make street photography interesting,i think its important to switch things up. check this few points:

1.Shoot in Different Areas 
As a  street photographer you should not shoot in the same old place every time at your exploration. try to find  different location, streets and interesting scenes. you don't need to travel all the way to Paris,china or Germany to shoot or get lovely scenes. Start with your own street at your home town, find  a strategic place that looks busy and interesting, exhaust the place then move to the other street.  If you have a  car much better, yo can drive to the next town and explore more just to make you street photography interesting and not bored. Avoid boredom at any cost, if you are brave enough yo can take a bus and  get off at random stop then start shooting.

As humans, we love to explore. We love serendipity, and discovering new places (think about all the guys who sailed around the world in search of new lands). Be a “street photography explorer”...Jessy Kigen 

2.Experiment on your skills
when shooting  and it  makes you feel bored, find something more interesting try switch up  things.Most important is lens, try use different lenses  when shooting. if you dont want to get close to the subject try a long range shots by using zoom lens.If yo are used to zoom lens try switch it to a prime lens, more wider angle.
Most of the time we  feel bored shooting with digital, if thats the case switch up to film.. make your photography interesting
If you are bored shooting like Henri Cartier Bresson (looking for an interesting background and waiting for someone interesting to walk into the scene), switch it up by trying to shoot more aggressively like Bruce Gilden (more head-on). Eric Kim

3.shoot in different Time Zone.
You want to make your street photography interesting try use different time zone, if yo are used to day time try late night shoot. try to  shoot the lighting on the streets near you,trust me you will love the street at night.

Life is short. When it comes to your street photography, follow your curiosity and what makes you happy and excited.  Make your photography interesting. Am out........#slickphoto#streetphotography#B&W...My story there life's ....Article by Jessy Kigen.

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Two faced Portrait.(Art meets reality)

Often the most striking portraits are those that break all the rules...Like the one above. Normally i love stunning portraits that create expression and the mood of the subject. when photographing a portrait the focus of the photograph is usually the person's face, although the entire body and the background context may be included. In the above piece i broke the rules by introducing a prop(Paper face portrait). Portrait Photography or portraiture  is photography of a person or group of people that displays the expression, personality, and mood of the subject. Am out.......photo by: Jessy Kigen...this was the night of Tattoo at Sailors Hurlingum courtesy of Holmes ink 3D and slick photo. Photo credit to Grey.#slickphoto#photography#B&W.. My story there life's.

A photographic portrait is a picture of someone who knows he is being photographed. - Jessy kigen

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Close up on the steps of day walkers

“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you aren’t close enough” – Robert Capa.....hello guys, before i get to today's piece let go back to the previous article on my blog:

The day walkers.(low angle shot of the day walkers)

We talked about the lens that was used to take the picture above on day walkers article, The same lens (Prime lens) was  used  on the piece above. when taking photographs on the street use a wide-angle lens;
prime lens 50mm

You can use any lens for street photography, but you’ll notice that most street photographers use a fairly wide-angle lens like the one above – somewhere between 24mm and 50mm. I use a 35mm lens on my full-frame DSLR, which means I can get in closer to the subject and get more involved in the scene like the photo above. 
I started with a longer lens because I lacked confidence, but gradually I switched to a 50mm, and now I use the 35mm about 80% of the time. "As your confidence builds, you get in closer" Jessy kigen Am out!!!!  lets learn more  tomorrow..am out.....picture of the day by Jessy kigen. #slick photo#photography  My story there life's.

The piece above was photographed along Wabera street Nairobi.(Close up on the steps of  day walkers)

lets share and leave comments.


Wednesday, August 6, 2014

The day walkers.(low angle shot of the day walkers)

I remember once my mentor said to me when shooting on the streets don't ask permission,If you ask permission first, then you end up with street portraits, which are different from what I’d call street photography. I started out asking the public if I could take their picture, and it turns out people tend to say yes! That gave me the confidence to shoot more daringly, which I find to be a lot more interesting. ......but at first   i was really scared  to have my self on the city  streets taking pictures of day walkers. but with time i learn t the above. on the above  picture it was a Sunday chilled day and  i used a prime lens; a lens of fixed focal length......In film and photography, a prime lens is either a photographic lens whose focal length is fixed, as opposed to a zoom lens, or it is the primary lens in a combination lens system. lets learn more  tomorrow..am out.....picture of the day by Jessy kigen. #slickphoto#R2R  My story there life's.
The whole point of taking pictures is so that you don’t have to explain things in words.” – Elliott Erwitt

story by:  jesst kigen

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

The camera Meets the street Urchin

Chilled Sunday on the streets of Nairobi as usual exploring the city....while i was busy taking snaps of the late night walkers..a little boy was calling me i looked left and right couldn't see no one i looked down... there he was looking at me with curious eyes while stretching his hands towards my Camera...mmmmhh!! He wanted to know what  i was holding, nice!! I removed the strap from my Neck and i gave the camera to the little boy to hold it,  i scrolled down to the photo i just took of him....he was so exited to see  a replica of him in the camera and he become my friend through the whole exploration in the city...Am out...#slickphoto#Street-photography#B&W.. Story By: Jessy kigen

My photography is a reflection, which comes to life in action and leads to meditation. Spontaneity – the suspended moment – intervenes during action, in the viewfinder.” – Abbas

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

One of my rare shot i did along Nakuru- Nairobi Highway....it was chilly and drizzling day, i  was from a photoshoot at some hotel in Nakuru. on my way back to Nairobi i realized i had no gas, i stopped by at a nearby petrol station and  that was shell petrol station. I came out of the car and i turned back and i saw a lovely and  Interesting geometric composition of the shell petrol station...i went to the Trank of my car and took my D5200 nikon ,standard lens and a tripod. The wet floor enabled  me to see the refection from the natural light of the sun and created this wet effect on my editing. Thanks to the Gas...am out. #slickphoto#photography#kenya....story by: Jessy kigen.... more photography story are lined up keep close with  my Blog.

A low angle shot of the street building of Nairobi (kenya).....a low-angle shot, is a shot from a camera angle positioned low on the vertical axis, anywhere below the eyeline, looking up...#slickphoto#Photography#B&W#Jessykigen.

Photographed by: jessy kigen

Friday, July 25, 2014

On my photography tour i met  this two champs on the streets of Mombasa. They showed me a peace sign like they knew what it meant, but in the actual sense they didn't know the meaning, for them its sign of  coolness in the society..being cool and all that. The Beauty in there soul taught  me one thing..."Beautiful soul aint for the rich but it lays  more on  the streets " By Jessy kigen   I bought them heavy lunch...And  i explained to them more about the peace sign they showed me. Am out. #slickphoto#streetphotography#tour#streetsoul.... https://www.facebook.com/slickphoto?ref=hl&ref_type=bookmark

Story by: jessy kigen